CBA, as Enacted (Contents)

Congressional Budget Act of 1974

Section 300, as Enacted

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Timetable

Sec. 300. (a) The timetable with respect to the congressional budget process for any fiscal year is as follows:

On or before :

Action to be completed :

November 10…………………… President submits current services budget.
15th day after Congress meets……………………………….. President submits his budget.
March 15 ………………………..… Committees and joint committees submit reports to Budget Committees.
April 1 ………………………………… Congressional Budget Office submits report to Budget Committees.
April 15 ……………………………….. Budget Committees report first concurrent resolution on the budget to their Houses.
May 15 ………………………………… Committees report bills and resolutions authorizing new budget authority.
May 15 ………………………………… Congress completes action on first concurrent resolution on the budget.
7th day after Labor Day …… Congress completes action on bills and resolutions providing new budget authority and new spending authority.
September 15 ………………….. Congress completes action on second required concurrent resolution on the budget.
September 25 ………………….. Congress completes action on reconciliation bill or resolution, or both, implementing second required concurrent resolution.
October 1 ………………………… Fiscal year begins.

 

 

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Section 301 (CBA, as Enacted)

Counsel Notes
JOINT EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF CONFERENCE COMMITTEE

The managers on the part of the House and the Senate of the conference of the two Houses on the amendments of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 7130) issued an explanatory statement of the legislation. This was included in a House Budget Committee print in 1975 after the bill’s enactment. It included the following description of this section:

Section 300. Timetable

Both the House and Senate versions set certain dates and deadlines for the completion of the various phases of the congressional budget process. The Senate amendment also contained a timetable showing the dates on which actions were to be completed.

The conference substitute fixes a timetable for the most important actions in the congressional budget process. The dates scheduled in the timetable are derived from relevant provisions of the bill.

In chronological order the events for which dates are provided in the timetable are: Presidential submission of the current services budget; submission of the executive budget; views and estimates of House and Senate committees reported to the Budget Committees; Congressional Budget Office report to the Budget Committees; reporting of first budget resolution; committee reports on new authorizing legislation; adoption of first budget resolution; completion or congressional action on budget authority legislation; adoption of second budget resolution; completion of reconciliation process; and start of new fiscal year. The managers do not believe that it is desirable or possible to specify in statute the exact date on which every event in the congressional budget process is to be accomplished. Certain matters can best be left to experience and the development of a workable process through flexible procedures.

Nevertheless, it is essential that the various interdependent elements in the budget process be assigned firm completion dates. For many facets of the budget process, it will not be possible to move ahead unless prior actions have been completed. Appropriations cannot be considered until the first budget resolution is adopted and necessary authorizations have been enacted. The reconciliation actions cannot be undertaken until the appropriation bills and the second budget resolution have been cleared. Consequently, the failure to complete a stage on schedule affects later actions as well.

It will require the full cooperation of the budget, authorizing, and appropriation committees, to make the new congressional budget process work. Any slippage early in the year will compound the unavoidably tight schedule in the period just prior to the start of the new fiscal year. If continuing resolutions are to be discarded as a way of coping with budget delays, the managers believe that it will be necessary to hold the four main phases of the congressional process (authorizations, budget resolutions, spending measures, and reconciliations) to the completion dates assigned in section 300. The managers have given careful consideration to all of the elements in the budget calendar and particularly to the need for allowing adequate time for committee preparation and floor debate on each budget decision.

The managers believe that in the future it will be necessary to authorize programs a year or more in advance of the period for which appropriations are to be made. When this is done Congress will have adequate time for considering budget-related legislation within the timetable of the congressional budget process. The managers call attention to section 607 which requires advance submission of proposed authorizing legislation, and to the expectation that Congress will develop a pattern of advance authorizations for programs now authorized on an annual or multiyear basis.

[Joint Explanatory Statement on the Committee of Conference on H.R. 7130; (Committee Print), Committee on the Budget, House of Representatives, 93d Congress, 2d Session, Washington D.C. 1975.]

CURRENT SECTION

Section 300. Timetable

Classification to the U.S. Code

This section was formerly classified to 31 U.S.C. 1321.


Legislative History Notes
Public Laws

Pub. L. 93–344, §300, July 12, 1974, 88 Stat. 306. The Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 enacted this section into law. 

Revision of title 31 of the u.s. code

Most of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 was classified to Title 31 of the U.S. Code but has since been transferred either to title 2 (The Congress) or to a revised Title 31. See the following for more information: 

 

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[BCR § 100e]