Budget Counsel Reference Directory

Rules of the Senate

Summary of the Standing Rules of the Senate

The primary source for the rules governing the procedures of the U.S. Senate is the Standing Rules of the Senate. These are, however, not exhaustive. For short periods of times, the Senate may use Unanimous Consent Agreements to govern procedures for debate or for other matters. Also, simple Senate Resolutions (with “S. Res.” preceding the number) or House or Senate Concurrent Resolutions (H. Con. Res. and S. Con. Res., respectively) may also include provisions governing terms such as points of order. 


Senate Rules – Contents

Senate Rules – Riddick’s Procedure

Senate Rules and Administration

Standing Rules of the Senate Summary


Senate Rule 11(a)

Paragraph 11(a) of rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of the Senate requires the committee report on a legislative measure include a statement on the budget effects of such measure. 

*  *  *  *  *  *  *

11. (a) The report accompanying each bill or joint resolution of a public character reported by any committee (except the Committee on Appropriations and the Committee on the Budget) shall contain

(1) an estimate, made by such committee, of the costs which would be incurred in carrying out such bill or joint resolution in the fiscal year in which it is reported and in each of the five fiscal years following such fiscal year (or for the authorized duration of any program authorized by such bill or joint resolution, if less than five years), except that, in the case of measures affecting the revenues, such reports shall require only an estimate of the gain or loss in revenues for a one-year period; and

(2) a comparison of the estimate of costs described in subparagraph (1) made by such committee with any estimate of costs made by any Federal agency; or

(3) in lieu of such estimate or comparison, or both, a statement of the reasons why compliance by the committee with the requirements of subparagraph (1) or (2), or both, is impracticable.

Senate Rule 11(b)

Paragraph 11(b) of rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of the Senate requires the committee report on a legislative measure to include an evaluation on the regulatory impact the bill will have.  

*  *  *  *  *  *  * 

(b) Each such report (except those by the Committee on Appropriations) shall also contain

(1) an evaluation, made by such committee, of the regulatory impact which would be incurred in carrying out the bill or joint resolution. The evaluation shall include (A) an estimate of the numbers of individuals and businesses who would be regulated and a determination of the groups and classes of such individuals and businesses, (B) a determination of the economic impact of such regulation on the individuals, consumers, and businesses affected, (C) a determination of the impact on the personal privacy of the individuals affected, and (D) a determination of the amount of additional paperwork that will result from the regulations to be promulgated pursuant to the bill or joint resolution, which determination may include, but need not be limited to, estimates of the amount of time and financial costs required of affected parties, showing whether the effects of the bill or joint resolution could be substantial, as well as reasonable estimates of the recordkeeping requirements that may be associated with the bill or joint resolution; or

(2) in lieu of such evaluation, a statement of the reasons why compliance by the committee with the requirements of clause (1) is impracticable.

(c) It shall not be in order for the Senate to consider any such bill or joint resolution if the report of the committee on such bill or joint resolution does not comply with the provisions of subparagraphs (a) and (b) on the objection of any Senator.

 

Previous:

§075. Rules (Senate) – Riddick’s Procedure

Next:

§077. (Unassigned)

[BCR § 076]